Why You Should Heart Cranberries

Red is the color of the heart!  So, I’m taking this opportunity to highlight the small—but mighty—cranberry. These berries are packed with nutrients and phytonutrients that research has associated with good heart health.
Vitamin C
Cranberries are near the top of the food chain when it comes to fruits high in vitamin C. This antioxidant blocks some of the harm caused by the free radicals that may play a role in heart disease, cancer, and other conditions.1A cup of chopped cranberries contains 24% of your daily value (DV) of vitamin C.
Fiber
Diets higher in fiber have been associated with reduced risk of developing various conditions, including coronary heart disease, hypertension, and stroke.2 That same cup of chopped cranberries gives you 20% of your DV for fiber.
Anthocyanins
The cranberry’s rich red color comes primarily from phytonutrients called anthocyanins. These compounds have antioxidant properties that have been shown to help fight inflammation and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.3
It’s clear I love cranberries—and even better you can too since they’re part of the Orchard and Vegetable Blend capsules and chewables, as well as the Complete Cranberry Nutrition Bars. If you already take JP+, that means you’re probably already enjoying some of the cranberry’s benefits. And rest assured that they use non-GMO ingredients, which is great for your peace of mind, too.
Feed Your Heart
Even if you’re getting their benefits in Juice Plus+, cranberries lend themselves to a host of heart-healthy dishes. Whether you’re in the mood for a breakfast treat, salad or side dish, here are a few recipes to get you started.
Feed Your Heart
Cranberry-walnut quick bread (via eatingwell.com)
Fruit salad with cranberry poppy seed dressing (via heart.org)
Wild rice pilaf with cranberries and apples (via Mayo Clinic)